Revision history for MagicalSchools


Revision [770]

Last edited on 2010-05-12 10:14:44 by BaxilDragon [Redo intro, add note on pragmatists]
Additions:
On one level, a mage is a mage is a mage: anyone who can "cast spells" is applying their willpower to produce direct effects on reality. But mages have very different ideas about where that power comes from, how to access it, and the constraints under which they operate.
A "magical school" is a collection of these most fundamental ideas. To use an analogy with spirituality, it is something like a mage's religion (whereas a [[MagicalTraditions tradition]] is a denomination, and a [[MagicalGroups working group]] is a church). Each tradition subscribes to a single one of these schools -- although they will not agree on the details with other traditions in that school! Intra-school disagreements are, if anything, more heated than the external ones.
Although a mage's school tells you nothing about their beliefs, style, ethics or power level, it has an enormous impact on //what they are capable of.// Magic is about belief shaping reality, after all -- so what one believes about magic makes a difference!
**Beliefs:** Magic is generated by God (or another higher power, space aliens, spirits, etc) and shared with us as a gift. Some people's faith/desire opens a channel to that source and allows them to manifest its power. Many traditions say that only certain people -- or certain faiths -- are capable of doing this. (Other mages who don't follow this path may be explained as blasphemers, perverting the gift for evil purposes; or may be explained as channeling power from a different source such as Satan.)
//(Note that most mages will pick up a few tricks from friends and colleagues in other schools as a normal part of their learning process. This does not make them capital-p Pragmatists. What distinguishes a Pragmatist is the philosophical belief that a single approach to spellcasting is insufficient; and the determination to incorporate// anything //that works, even when it means relearning the same spells in different ways.)//
CategoryConcepts CategoryMagic
Deletions:
On one level, a mage is a mage is a mage: anyone who can "cast spells" is applying their willpower to produce direct effects on reality. But mages have very different ideas about where that power comes from, how to access it, and the constraints under which they (do or should) operate. A "magical school" is a collection of these most basic ideas.
Although a mage's school tells you nothing about their beliefs, style, ethics or power level, it has an enormous and fundamental impact on //what they are capable of.// Magic is about belief shaping reality, after all -- so what one believes about magic makes a difference!
Each [[MagicalTraditions tradition]] subscribes to a single one of these schools -- although they will not agree on the details with other traditions in that school! Intra-school disagreements are, if anything, more heated than the external ones.
**Beliefs:** Magic is generated by God (or another higher power, space aliens, etc) and shared with us as a gift. Some people's faith/desire opens a channel to that source and allows them to manifest its power. Many traditions say that only certain people -- or certain faiths -- are capable of doing this. (Other mages who don't follow this path may be explained as blasphemers, perverting the gift for evil purposes; or may be explained as channeling power from a different source such as Satan.)
CategoryMeta CategoryConcepts CategoryMagic


Revision [754]

Edited on 2010-04-29 16:41:13 by BaxilDragon [Reformatting sidebar table]
Additions:
>> |!|{text-align:center}||
|?|{background-color:white} **Schools at a Glance:** The attitudes distinguishing the major magical schools. ||
|=|(x:2;y:2) Source of Spell's ... |=|(x:2) Control ||
Deletions:
>> |?| **Schools at a Glance:** The attitudes distinguishing the major magical schools. ||
|=|(x:2;y:2) Source of Spell's ... |=|(x:2){text-align:center} Control ||


Revision [743]

Edited on 2010-04-29 01:44:28 by BaxilDragon [+Top linkbox]
Additions:
//Mage classification: **''School'' "">>"" [[MagicalTraditions Tradition]] "">>"" [[MagicalGroups Working Group]]**//
Deletions:
//Mage classification: **[[MagicalSchools School]] "">>"" [[MagicalTraditions Tradition]] "">>"" Working Group**//


Revision [719]

Edited on 2010-04-27 19:07:33 by BaxilDragon [Yanking from Traditions page onto its own, +fixes]
Additions:
**Advantages:** Can adapt their spellcasting style for situational advantage, working as any of the major schools would. Plays well with others; can contribute to other schools' rituals at full effectiveness. Pragmatists' outside-the-box approach gives them the ability to tackle problems other mages have written off as insoluble or dangerous -- for instance, after the EventBrogiAccident, mages from this school are the only ones who can safely teleport (not that anyone believes them when they say so).
**Disadvantages:** A niche style with no real traditions to speak of (though there are a few working groups that haven't quite reached the critical mass or academic weight to hit "tradition" status). The training necessary to reach a given power level is //immense// compared to the major schools -- you don't learn this school of magic so much as derive it yourself from scratch. Requires superhuman discipline, insight, introspection, time commitment, and the ability to believe six impossible things before breakfast. And yet everyone else still ignores them or views them as unserious cranks.
**New mages:** Very rarely start here; usually they migrate over from another school after reaching the limits of their prior approach. Mages who start here from scratch typically have a "preferred" school and dabble in the others, and go through their learning process in a similar way to members of that school.
Deletions:
**Advantages:** Can adapt their spellcasting style for situational advantage. Plays well with others; can contribute to other schools' rituals at full effectiveness. Have the greatest opportunity for ultimate advancement. Pragmatists' outside-the-boxes approach gives them the ability to tackle problems other mages have written off as insoluble or dangerous; for instance, after the EventBrogiAccident, mages from this school are the only ones who can safely teleport (not that anyone believes them when they say so).
**Disadvantages:** A niche style, very reliant on individual effort, with no real traditions to speak of (though there are a few working groups that haven't quite reached the critical mass or academic weight to hit "tradition" status). The training necessary to reach a given power level is the highest of all the schools. Requires superhuman discipline, insight, introspection, time commitment, and the ability to believe six impossible things before breakfast. And yet everyone else still ignores them or views them as unserious cranks.
**New mages:** Very rarely start here; usually they migrate over from another school after reaching the limits of their prior approach. Mages who start here from scratch typically have a "preferred" school and dabble in the others, and go through the learning process in a similar way to members of that school.


Revision [718]

Edited on 2010-04-27 18:49:48 by BaxilDragon [Breaking out from Traditions page onto its own]
Additions:
//Mage classification: **[[MagicalSchools School]] "">>"" [[MagicalTraditions Tradition]] "">>"" Working Group**//
>> |?| **Schools at a Glance:** The attitudes distinguishing the major magical schools. ||
|=|(x:2;y:2) Source of Spell's ... |=|(x:2){text-align:center} Control ||
|=| //Internal// |=| //External// ||
|=|(y:2) Power |=| //Internal// ||{background-color:white} Volitionist ||{background-color:white} - ||
|=| //External// ||{background-color:white} Directivist ||{background-color:white} Externalist ||
//Pragmatists:// Combine approaches.
//Apathists:// Have no coherent theory.
>>
On one level, a mage is a mage is a mage: anyone who can "cast spells" is applying their willpower to produce direct effects on reality. But mages have very different ideas about where that power comes from, how to access it, and the constraints under which they (do or should) operate. A "magical school" is a collection of these most basic ideas.
Although a mage's school tells you nothing about their beliefs, style, ethics or power level, it has an enormous and fundamental impact on //what they are capable of.// Magic is about belief shaping reality, after all -- so what one believes about magic makes a difference!
Each [[MagicalTraditions tradition]] subscribes to a single one of these schools -- although they will not agree on the details with other traditions in that school! Intra-school disagreements are, if anything, more heated than the external ones.
**Disadvantages:** Spells are prone to erratic failure, and they have little recourse when that happens ("oh well, that must not have been God's will"). Traditions are insular and exclusive. Much hand-waving is necessary to explain how mages of various faiths can all make it work. Leads VERY easily to hardcore dualism and frightening eschatology.
**Beliefs:** Magic is hard. Let's go shopping! [[http://snowclones.org/2008/02/19/x-is-hard-let’s-go-shopping/ (*)]]
Deletions:
On one level, a mage is a mage is a mage: anyone who can "cast spells" is applying their willpower to produce direct effects on reality. But mages have very different ideas about where that power comes from, how to access it, and the constraints under which they (do or should) operate.
A "magical school" is a collection of these ideas. It is related to spellcasting in the same way that "a religion" is to "spirituality."
The levels of classification of magical ideology are, from broadest to narrowest: **School "">>"" [[MagicalTraditions Tradition]] "">>"" Working Group** (circle, coven, order, etc.). To extend the religious analogy, a school is like a religion (Christianity); a tradition is like a denomination (Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Baptist); a working group is like a single church. Of course, someone may consider themselves to be part of a school (or tradition) without having any more specific affiliation; all three levels are meaningful on their own.
====Schools of Magical Thought====
After TheChanges brought magic into the world, people naturally sought explanations for what this effect was and why it worked. The explanations tended to fall into a few larger categories, which academic mages naturally began to refer to as "schools."
Broadly speaking, a [[MagicalTraditions tradition]] will subscribe to a single one of these views -- although they will not agree on the details with other traditions in that school! Intra-school disagreements are, if anything, more heated than the external ones.
**Disadvantages:** Spells are more prone to erratic failure, and they have less recourse when that happens ("oh well, that must not have been God's will"). Traditions are insular and exclusive. Much hand-waving is necessary to explain how mages of various faiths can all make it work. Leads VERY easily to hardcore dualism and frightening eschatology.
**Beliefs:** Magic is hard. Let's go shopping!


Revision [716]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2010-04-27 11:19:04 by BaxilDragon [Breaking out from Traditions page onto its own]
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